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Get information on a prescription treatment for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes of Bipolar I Disorder.

Living With Bipolar I Disorder

"What is difficult is also beautiful, good, great and so forth.

Hence everyone will realize that this is the most lavish praise that can be bestowed…"

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)


Educating yourself about Bipolar I Disorder and becoming more active in your treatments can help you to be more effective at managing your condition. An essential aspect of treating Bipolar I Disorder is medication, but there are other things you can do that can help as well. Remember — be sure to check with your doctor to ensure that any of the tips below might be right for you.

Know (and explain)
what to do

Talk to your doctor about what to do in case you experience an episode. Always keep written instructions along with medical and contact information in your purse or wallet so that you, a loved one, or bystanders can be prepared.

Manage your
medication properly

If left untreated, Bipolar I Disorder can become difficult for you and those who care about you. For this reason, it’s important to always take your medication as prescribed, even when you’re feeling better. Also, medication can be most effective when combined with positive lifestyle choices, such as eating healthy foods, getting exercise, and avoiding substance abuse.

Talk with people for
support

Find someone you can speak with about what you’re going through. Whether it’s a support group, a therapist, or even a good friend or a loved one, just talking can help you gain control over your thoughts, perceptions, and behavior. Another person or other people can help you find healthy ways to manage your condition. It’s all about support — reminding you that you’re not alone.

Establish healthy
routines

Getting enough sleep, doing appropriate exercise, practicing yoga or meditation, and/or eating healthy foods can all help reduce the stress that may trigger or worsen your symptoms. Find a routine that works for you, and try to stick with it.

Talking About Your
Bipolar I Disorder

After being diagnosed with Bipolar I Disorder, deciding if and how to share the news is really up to you. Those who have been concerned about the evident swings in your behavior, such as family and close friends, may be supportive to learn that you’re seeking treatment. On the other hand, you may find that some in your social circles have unfavorable attitudes or misconceptions about mental illness. You should feel no obligation to share your condition with them.

While some people may initially have difficulty accepting your diagnosis, you can improve their understanding of your condition by offering to educate them (see Resources and Organizations below). The simple fact is, the more people who care about you know about your illness, the better your relationships with them can be. Indeed, having a good relationship with close family members is believed to support better treatment results.

At any rate, whether or not you’re able to shift the attitudes of others, you should always remember that seeking proper treatment for your condition through a healthcare provider is the right course of action.

Remember — taking the appropriate medication as prescribed by a healthcare provider is a key component of a successful bipolar disorder treatment. For information on an FDA-approved prescription medicine for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes of Bipolar I Disorder, click here.

Talking About Your
Bipolar I Disorder

After being diagnosed with Bipolar I Disorder, deciding if and how to share the news is really up to you. Those who have been concerned about the evident swings in your behavior, such as family and close friends, may be supportive to learn that you’re seeking treatment. On the other hand, you may find that some in your social circles have unfavorable attitudes or misconceptions about mental illness. You should feel no obligation to share your condition with them.

While some people may initially have difficulty accepting your diagnosis, you can improve their understanding of your condition by offering to educate them (see Resources and Organizations Resources and Organizations below). The simple fact is, the more people who care about you know about your illness, the better your relationships with them can be. Indeed, having a good relationship with close family members is believed to support better treatment results.

At any rate, whether or not you’re able to shift the attitudes of others, you should always remember that seeking proper treatment for your condition through a healthcare provider is the right course of action.

Remember — taking the appropriate medication as prescribed by a healthcare provider is a key component of a successful bipolar disorder treatment. For information on an FDA-approved prescription medicine for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes of Bipolar I Disorder, click here.


Resources and Organizations
for Bipolar I Disorder

Various organizations offer support and resources for those affected by mood disorders, including people with Bipolar I Disorder, their families, and their caregivers.

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

The Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with mood disorders, including depression and bipolar disorder. DBSA sponsors local chapter meetings and online support groups; it also provides various educational materials, and offers a toll-free information line.

National Alliance on Mental Illness

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) is a grassroots organization that advocates to improve the lives of people and families affected by mental illness. The group’s motto is “You are not alone.” It strives to reduce the stigma about mental illness, strengthen family bonds, and achieve positive changes in the mental healthcare system.

American Psychiatric Association

The American Psychiatric Association is an organization of psychiatrists working together to ensure humane care and effective treatment for people living with mental illness. As the voice and conscience of modern psychiatry, it strives to promote ready access to quality psychiatric services and improve research into all aspects of mental illness.

American Society for Clinical Psychopharmacology

The American Society for Clinical Psychopharmacology (ASCP) is an organization dedicated to advancing the science and practice of clinical psychopharmacology. Its website offers various resources.


Resources and Organizations
for Bipolar I Disorder

Various organizations offer support and resources for those affected by mood disorders, including people with Bipolar I Disorder, their families, and their caregivers.

Visit DBSA Website
Visit NAMI Website
Visit American Psychiatric
Association Website
Visit ASCP Website